A THEORY FOR INTEGRATING KNOWLEDGE IN ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN EDUCATION

Ashraf M. Salama

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.26687/archnet-ijar.v2i1.180

Abstract

This paper argues for introducing a theory for knowledge integration in architectural design education. A contextual analysis of the reasons for developing a theory is introduced and reasons are categorized. The milieu of the theory is constituted in several contextual elements. The theory encompasses a number of underlying theories and concepts derived from other fields that differ dramatically from architecture. It consists of three major components: the disciplinary component; the cognitive-philosophical component; and the inquiryepistemic component. Each of these components encompasses other smaller components integral to the building of the theory itself. Notably, the three components address ways in which knowledge can be integrated, how the desired integration would meet the capacity of the human mind, how such integration relates to the nature of knowledge and how knowledge about it is acquired, conveyed, and assimilated. Possible mechanisms for knowledge acquisition are an indispensable component of the theory, whose aim is to foster the development of responsive knowledge critical to the successful creation of built environments.


Keywords

Architectural education; knowledge integration; transdisciplinarity; design studio; systemic pedagogy

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